Month: January 2018

Low Carb Diet Recipes -Tasteaholics Review

 

What if instead of searching online for hours looking for delicious, low carb diet recipes, you could have entire meal plans sent to your inbox auto magically each week – just in time for grocery shopping day?

That’s exactly what Tasteaholics offers when you sign up for their Low Carb Weekly Meal Plan service. As low as $7.49 per month, they promise delicious, done-for-you meal plans complete with recipes and shopping lists.

When people tend to fail at their weight loss goals, it’s for two main reasons: The diet plans aren’t simple enough and they get bored with the food.

I can totally relate to that so when I saw what Tasteaholics had to offer, I had to try it. Here’s my honest review.

The Tasteaholics Low Carb Weekly Meal Plan

Tasteaholics offers a very low carb, high fat diet plan called Keto, short for Ketogenic. Ketogenic diet plans normally range anywhere from 20 to 60 grams of carbs per day with overall calories to come from 70% fat, 25% protein, and 5% carbohydrates.

When your body goes into Ketosis, it uses fat as it’s main energy source instead of the glucose created by carbs resulting in more efficient weight loss. And since you don’t eat starchy carbs on this diet, your body doesn’t have to deal with insulin spikes so you’ll feel more satisfied, your cravings disappear, and you’ll have more energy, as well.

Tasteaholics offers 3 plans to choose from: Monthly at $9.99, quarterly ($8.33 per month), or yearly ($7.49 per mo), and ordering was super simple. No obnoxious up sells!

The process took just a few simple clicks and I had my first weekly meal plan complete with the following:

  • Week-at-a-glance – a very nicely laid out overview of the week including daily calories, fat, protein, and carb counts so I don’t have to take time to figure it all out
  • Shopping list – grouped by meats, dairy, produce and pantry items, this makes my supermarket visit quicker, who wants to hang out here for an hour or more when you’ve got better things to do with your time?
  • Snack ideas – it’s super important to have handy snacks at the ready so you can avoid the all to available starchy, sugary snacks that seem to be everywhere
  • Substitutes for common food allergies – no, you don’t have to figure this out either, a very nice additional benefit, tailored to the week’s recipes

Low Carb Diet Recipes

I think one of the best features of the Tasteaholics recipes is that the ingredients aren’t exotic or expensive, they can be found at pretty much any supermarket. I live in the middle of nowhere and I found all of this week’s ingredients at Walmart except for the sugar substitute erythritol, but it’s easy to order from Amazon

Here’s a brief sample of my first week: Chorizo and Red Pepper Skillet, Ham & Egg Souffles with Avocado, Chili Con Carne, Herbed Dijon Chicken, Bacon Pancakes, & Cheesy Baked Shepherd’s Pie.

Sticking to the menu exactly, the highest daily carb count was 26.5 grams, but if your carb goal is a little higher, you can certainly add more veggies, a snack or low carb dessert and still stay on track to lose weight.

My overall opinion of the Tasteaholics Low Carb Weekly Meal Plan – 4.5 of 5 Stars

The only reason I didn’t give it 5 Stars is that I kind of wish the recipes came with pictures. For instance, the Crispy Pork Belly recipe did not sound that appetizing to me, so I passed on it. However, my southern friends tell me that pork belly is incredible, so…

Review Summary

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Pros:

  1. Fast & easy ordering, no annoying up sells
  2. Good value – A totally done-for-you week of meals and recipes
  3. Simple, tasty and satisfying recipes
  4. Organized shopping list
  5. Snack recommendations
  6. Food allergy substitutes

Cons:

No recipe pictures

Tasteaholics does offer a full line of cookbooks complete with photos at their website,  you can find out more and get started with a FREE week of meal plans by clicking here

You can learn more about low carb diet plans here.

I’d love to hear from you! if you have a question or would like to leave a comment below, that would be awesome!

To Your Success,

Karyn

 

Bowflex Max Trainer Review​

Product: Bowflex Max Trainer M7

Price: $2199 includes FREE protective floor mat & FREE shipping

Best Price:  Bowflex.com

Warranty: 3 year

My Rating: 4 of 5



The Bowflex Max Trainer Overview

The Bowflex Max Trainer is a hybrid: Kind of a cross between an elliptical and a stair climber.  The unique design makes it suitable for tiny spaces.

This is the top-level version of the Max and provides the most variety of workout programs and resistance levels of the versions, it also has a longer warranty than most fitness equipment on the market at 3 years.

All Bowflex Max Trainers offer the “14 minute workout”, a High Intensity Interval Training that gives you the same cardio benefits as a much longer conventional workout but in less than half the time. According to many scientific studies on HIIT, you also continue to burn calories for hours after the workout ends.

While the Bowflex Max certainly delivers on this promise by offering a built in HIIT program called “Max”, it’s certainly not the only option for this kind of training. You can perform HIIT on other machines such as ellipticals or stair climbers as well.

But if you’re limited on space, the Bowflex Max has the smallest footprint of any quality cardio machine on the market and for me, that was the main selling point.

How does it perform?

I’ve been using the Bowflex Max for about 9 months now without any issues. Although I’ve used a manual Tabata 4 minute super intense training a few times, I find it more convenient to just use the Max setting and let the machine alert me as to when to change intensity.

It’s also a pretty intense workout for the quads. In fact, my hubby found it to be so intense that he doesn’t feel he can get his heart rate high enough for a decent cardio workout because he has to slow down so much in order to ease his burning quads.

When I first started using the Max, I just slowed down for a minute or two until my legs got used to it, so that’s not an issue for me.
The latest version of the M7 offers ‘target’ programming that learns and adapts to your personal fitness level as you train, and offers up to 11 different programs for variety and challenge as you progress.

As I said before, this machine offers a challenging workout and with 20 levels of resistance, I honestly can’t imagine that most people would ever outgrow its available workout levels.

Current Best Price for the Bowflex Max Trainer

At the time of this post, the best price I could find for the Max is $2199 whether you get it from Amazon or at Bowflex.com. Bowflex also offers financing with 0% interest for 18 months (qualified buyers) which is 6 months longer than Amazon’s financing.
But when you add the free mat (Bowflex) to protect your floor ($99 value), and free shipping,  that seals the deal as the best value out there on the Max.

However, you still might want to see how other machines compare to the Bowflex Max trainer. For me, it came down to the overall footprint of the machine, as I have a very small space, this was the deciding factor.

If you have enough space for an elliptical, there are many other options out there. You can take a look at pricing and most importantly, read the reviews on comparable machines through the links below.

I would tend to focus on any quality concerns, how long it takes to set up, and probably most importantly, how customer service handled any questions or problems when they arose. A warranty is only as good as the company that’s backing it.

Don’t get stuck with a poor quality machine that you not only won’t use, but that you can’t even ethically sell to someone who would.

Bottom line:  The Bowflex Max is a great machine, but you can get a great HIIT workout in 14 minutes with any elliptical or stair climber type trainer of decent quality.

 

We are not doctors. This site offers health, fitness and nutritional information and is designed for educational purposes only. This information is not a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Any concerns or questions about your health should be discussed with a physician or other health-care professional.

Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional based on information provided on this site. The use of any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk.

We also provide certain supplements and nutrition products through the site. Information regarding these products may not have been evaluated by the FDA. We make no claim as to the efficacy of the products, neither the products nor information provided on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why You Don’t Need a Low Carb Food List to Lose Weight

Why You Don't Need a Low Carb Food List to Lose Weight

Most low carb diets like Adkins and Keto, require that you keep your net carbs under so many grams per day whether you’re trying to lose or maintain your weight. (Net carbs = total grams of carbs – fiber).

This is an effective way to lose weight and it really is pretty simple, just read the labels of any packaged foods, consult a low carb food list and record what you eat in a daily food diary.

But what if you find recording everything you put in your mouth too tedious or inconvenient? There’s another way to lose weight without the need to constantly refer to a chart or record everything you eat. Most diet books would have you think this is easy but don’t we already have enough stuff to keep track of?

In this post, we’ll explore exactly why you don’t need a low carb food list to lose weight and also learn the truly low-hassle way to be successful.

Good Carb/Bad Carb, What’s the Difference?

Since we now know that the key to weight loss is keeping our blood sugar and thus insulin levels from spiking, it should be as easy as avoiding those foods that cause this, namely, carbohydrates. But it’s not that cut and dry.

Although all carbs are eventually broken down into blood sugar (glucose), the main difference between good and bad carbs is the speed and ease with which they do.

The glucose molecules of natural, unrefined foods such as vegetables and fruit, have a much tighter bond and are intertwined with fiber and cellulose. It takes time for the digestive process to break the glucose free and send it to the bloodstream.

Not so with starchy carbs like pasta, bread, potatoes and rice. The bonds that hold the glucose are weaker in these foods and are easily broken apart by the digestive system. There’s just not enough fiber or cellulose to slow absorption down, and remember, starch has many more glucose molecules than even table sugar, so it hits your bloodstream fast, causing a major spike in insulin to get it under control.

Counting Carbs vs. Glycemic Load

Since some carbs break down at different rates than others,  simply counting carbs isn’t enough…we need an easy way to determine the good ones from the bad. Enter the Glycemic Load

The Glycemic Load is how food scientists rate the effect a certain food has on blood sugar based on actual serving sizes. I’ve included a chart below that compares net carbs to glycemic load so you can see the dramatic difference in some foods versus others.

Since I promised you that you wouldn’t have to memorize nutritional info or carry a chart around with you, we’ll use this just to illustrate some key points.

Serving Size Net Carbs Glycemic Load
1 Pancake 5″ diameter 22 346
2 Bagel 1 medium 35 340
3 White Rice 1 cup 44 283
4 Baked potato 1 medium 24 246
5 Raisin Bran 1 cup 39 227
6 Brown rice 1cup 39.5 219
7 Coca-cola 12 oz 39 218
8 Hamburger bun 5″ 27 213
9 Doughnut 1 medium 22 205
10 Cornflakes 1 cup 23 199
11 Macaroni 1 cup 78 181
12 Corn-on-the-cob 1 ear 28 171
13 Spaghetti 1 cup 41.5 166
14 Oatmeal 1 cup 23 154
15 Chocolate cake 4″x4″x1″ 34 154
16 Grape-Nuts 1/2 cup 41 142
17 Cheerios 1 cup 18.5 142
18 Tortilla, corn 1 medium 11 120
19 Orange juice 1 cup 25.5 119
20 Whole wheat bread 1 slice 10 117
21 Cookie 1 medium 9 114
22 Banana 1 medium 9 114
23 White bread 1 slice 14 100
24 All-Bran 1/2 cup 8 85
25 Tortilla, wheat 1 medium 13 80
26 Apple 1 medium 21.5 78
27 Orange 1 medium 9 71
28 Pineapple 1 slice 6 50
29 Table sugar 1 round tsp 5 28
30 Milk (whole) 1 cup 12 27
31 Strawberries 1 cup 9 13
32 Carrot 1 medium 5 11
33 Peanuts 1/4 cup 3 7
34 Pork 10 oz 0 0
35 Lettuce 1 cup 1 0
36 Fish 8 oz 0 0
37 Eggs 1 large 0 0
38 Chicken 1 breast 0 0
39 Cheese 1  slice (2 oz) 0.8 0
40 Butter 1 T 0 0
41 Broccoli 1/2 cup 5 0

For example, take a look at the carbs in 1 cup of strawberries (#31). 9 grams of carbs, not bad…unless you’re on a typical low carb diet, such as Keto. 9 grams is nearly 1/2 of your total carb allowance FOR THE DAY. Which is also why no fruit, even fruits low in sugar like berries are forbidden during the weight loss phase of Adkins.

Now take a look at the glycemic load of strawberries – a measly 13, that’s only 13% of the load caused by 1 piece of white bread (the standard measurement). You could even sprinkle a teaspoon of sugar on a cup of strawberries and be at a glycemic load of 41, considered low on the glycemic load chart.

Get Rid of Starchy Filler Foods without Feeling Deprived

Take another look at this example chart, but this time, take a look at the foods at 100 or above for glycemic load. These are the foods we want to avoid. They send our blood sugar levels too high, too fast, causing insulin spikes, weight gain and all manner of chronic disease, most notably, Type 2 diabetes.

Do you need to memorize the list? Nope, if you look closely, you’ll notice that a whopping 21 out of the 24 foods at 100 or higher (GL), are either flour or grain products, potatoes and rice. The other 3 are Coke, orange juice, and banana.

You really only need to avoid 4 types of foods in order to lose weight:                                        Why You Don't Need a Low Carb Food List to Lose Weight

  1. Flour and grain products
  2. Potatoes
  3. Rice
  4. Sugary soft drinks and fruit juices

That’s it. These bad carbs are pretty easy to spot, too so no need to read lengthy ingredients lists. Now, if you’re thinking “But I love my chocolate cake! No way I can face life knowing I can never have another piece!”

No prob! Simply divide a typical 4″  x 4″  piece in half, and you have 2 servings at a GL of 77 each. You can enjoy a piece every day if you like. In fact, as long as you stick to 1 or fewer servings of foods 100 or higher per day, you should be okay.

One caveat: If you’re like me, there are some foods that you may find nearly impossible to eat at ‘safe’ serving sizes. They’re just too addictive… you know who they are.

I’ve basically learned to forget they even exist and instead, substitute for other rich, tasty treats that are satisfying enough in a few bites that I’m not tempted to go back for seconds…and thirds.

Another thing to keep in mind when eating occasional bad carbs is to avoid eating them on an empty stomach. If you eat low carb or better yet – no carb foods like those at the bottom of this chart first, they will slow down the digestion/absorption rate of the treat and thwart glucose spikes. You can also use nuts, seeds or other fatty foods like olives to “block” the bad carbs.  Learn more about Starch Blockers here

Keep It Simple for Long Term Success

As long as you avoid starchy carbs and sugary drinks most of the time, reduce serving sizes when you do indulge, and always eat carb “blockers” like vegetables and/or fatty foods first, you don’t need lists, carb counting or even a detailed food diary to be successful.
Now that you know the difference between good carbs and bad carbs, you should relax knowing you can eat a wider variety of foods and still lose weight consistently, without feeling deprived.
Bon Appetit!

Can you think of some rich, creamy and satisfying foods that you can eat instead of starchy “filler” foods? I’d love to hear from you! Please leave a comment below!

 

To Your Success,

Karyn

 

We are not doctors. This site offers health, fitness and nutritional information and is designed for educational purposes only. This information is not a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Any concerns or questions about your health should be discussed with a physician or other health-care professional.

Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional based on information provided on this site. The use of any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk.

We also provide certain supplements and nutrition products through the site. Information regarding these products may not have been evaluated by the FDA. We make no claim as to the efficacy of the products, neither the products nor information provided on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.